Phoenix New Times

As Joe Arpaio recently received a Presidential pardon for one of the many crimes that he’s been accused of over the years, the ruling by United States District Judge, Susan R. Bolton, has made it official. Read more: Michael Lacey | Facebook and Village Voice Media | Wikipedia

Many citizens of the place that “Sheriff Joe” terrorized for so long, Maricopa County, expressed anger over the decision, but the vast majority knew that he would spend any time in jail; this decision confirms that. Jim Larkin and Michael Lacey publicly denounced President Trump’s decision.

The onset of the 1970’s marked a period in which the political climate in America had erupted into violence, not just in Vietnam, where the war was being fought, but at home, in America too.

Jim Larkin and Michael Lacey, who would act as longstanding Executive Editor and Chief Executive Officer, respectively, where merely dropouts of Arizona State University, but as a part of the growing anti-war crowd, and feeling the need to join in the effort, they began developing ideas about an alternative newspaper. Learn more about Jim Larkin and Michael Lacey: http://www.laceyandlarkinfronterafund.org/about-lacey-larkin-frontera-fund/michael-lacey/ and http://www.bizjournals.com/phoenix/potmsearch/detail/submission/6427427/Jim_Larkin

It was the Kent State shootings, where four students were gunned down by Ohio National Guardsmen, with another nine students sustaining injuries, that seemed to be the final straw. Later in 1970, Michael Lacey, joined by a group of newspaper hopefuls, such as Frank Fiore, Karen Lofgren, and Hal Smith, all of which belonged to the anti-war crowd, initiated the inaugural issue of the Phoenix New Times.

Around the country, there was growing desire for alternative news media, and underground papers began popping up in each major city, but the Phoenix New Times garnered its own following nonetheless.

They would cover a number of social and political issues from a perspective that differed drastically from the traditional news outlets of the day, even delving into new forms of rock and roll music during a time when it was shunned by the mainstream.

Over the next two years, with Jim Larkin, who had a wife and children, had joined the team and immediately had an effect on the marketing of the Phoenix New Times newspaper. It was J.C. Penny that gave Larkin and Lacey their first major break when they decided to take out full-page ads in the fledgling publication, and as the decade passed, they began implementing new sections that became immensely popular.

One of the most notable additions to the Phoenix New Times publication was the satirical comic strip, Honky Tonk Sue, which was developed by Bob Boze Bell. In 1983, Jim Larkin and Michael Lacey, now the heads of New Times Media, purchased the Denver-based publication, Westword, from Patricia Calhoun, who’d launched the news-and-arts weekly several years prior in 1977.

This would be the first of many acquisitions of publications around the country that held similar views regarding political and social events. LA Weekly, OC Weekly, Nashville Scene, Miami New Times, and the most famous alternative newspaper, Village Voice, would all become a part of the New Times roster over the next few decades. In 2012, Jim Larkin and Michael Lacey stepped away from New Times Media.

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